Ethics for Dummies

From guest contributor Steve Gimbel at Lawyers, Guns and Money:

So the official response to the massacre and cover up in Haditha is … wait for it … "core values training on moral and ethical standards on the battlefield". Now, I have no battlefield experience myself, but I am a veteran of the fight over core values training on moral and ethical standards on the battlefield having been in the Leadership, Ethics, and Law department at the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis where they brought me in to teach a couple of courses in philosophy and to help develop supporting materials for their version of ethics training. That was also a response to several scandals that had hit the Academy. This one will no doubt be as well thought out as that one….

This call is no different from the one in Annapolis, it is a band-aid. No, it will not do anything. Very simple. Acting in an ethically proper sense is a two step process. Step 1: determine what is the right thing to do in the situation. Step 2: do it. In most cases step 1 is trivially easy; it is step 2 — having the moral courage to stand up and do what is right, even when it is not expedient –that is most frequently the tricky one. This is why moral philosophy is so easily made fun of; most of the time telling right from wrong is so obvious that it seems as if there is no rational process at all, as if we simply have a sixth sense in which the morally acceptable options just appear before our mind's eyes….

"Ethics training" is an insult to step 1 in that it treats the trivial cases (don't assassinate little children) as if they weren't trivial and treats the hard cases (you have a family that you need to come home to, you are in a war zone where people are trying to kill you, but you don't know the language or the culture or exactly who the people trying to kill you are. what do you do?) as if they are a matter of following a few simple rules. It is an insult to step 2 because it treats the notion of character as if it were something you could acquire by sitting in a Tony Robbins seminar. I've got 18-21 year-olds who flip out over a logic final and threats to one's GPA are a little less traumatic than watching your friend get blown up by an IED. Yes, the massacre is indicative of an ethical problem (I'm a philosopher, I say deep things), but it is one in which step 2 is hampered by psychological issues arising from extreme stress and trauma on young adults who have not fully matured. Stress and trauma that are the result of political and diplomatic immaturity and incompetence and irrational degrees of belief in neo-conservative doctrine. With the real problems underlying the situation, to have ethics training served up again as a finger in the dike just makes me want to scream.

Last night in Dubrovnik at Dinner, the waiter asked me where I was from.  I allowed as how I was from America.  He grinned (his English was not very good, but he knew how to be friendly and accommodating as a waiter should) and said "Oh, America!  Strong!"  He made a fake muscle-man pose like Hans and Franz from the old Saturday Night Live sketches.  I felt embarassed and ashamed: not only that the image of America, once the land of the free and the home of the brave, was now one of brute, dumb strength, but also that the image belies the fear and weakness driving America today.

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About James G. Milles

Professor of Law, SUNY Buffalo Law School

Posted on June 1, 2006, in Politics, Travel, War. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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